Past Mission Trips

Hannah, a Queens University student, has written about her recent experience on a Place of Hope mission trip to Cameroon.

Read about it here.



July 2012


"Finally, finally, finally the Lord has done it, finally, finally, yeah."

 

Arrival Date: July 2012
Destination: Ngoketunjia, Northwest Cameroon
View Pictures from the Trip

Image this chorus erupting from young children, ladies of the church, and from large crowds of happy people. This is what it was like most afternoons on our trip to Cameroon, West Africa with A Place of Hope. The trip was a chance to visit 5 villages in the Bamenda area in the Northwest Region of the country and deliver supplies that had been generously donated by students in the Charlotte Mecklenburg School system. These supplies left their well-lit, tiled classrooms and schools in North Carolina and traveled to areas where pencils become cherished and schools have concrete or dirt floors, and I was lucky enough to see these supplies land into the hands of young children who will use them to better their education and whose smiles showed their pride in having something of their very own.

In addition to the opportunity to see the supplies land in the children hands, we were also lucky to see the culture and unique ways that Cameroon operates. We were able to see the local chiefs, or Fons, and understand the unique way that A Place of Hope can operate through their villages. We also met the Prime Minister of Cameroon and had the opportunity to hear his words of wisdom. He is a man who truly believes that only people coming together can lead the future of any country. All of this in addition to good food, good friends, and good works!
 
Find details about future missions on our Upcoming Trips page.


March 2010

Arrival Date: March 2010
Destination: Ngoketunjia, Northwest Cameroon
Trip Length: 13 Days
Contribution: 800 backpacks & supplies


View pictures from this trip >
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The purpose of the 13-day trip was two-fold: to distribute school supplies and hygienic supplies that had been collected in the two and half years since the 2007 trip; and to dedicate a school building made possible by a financial donation from Selwyn Avenue Presbyterian Church. Over 800 back packs and supplies were distributed to the children in the villages of Babungo, Bamunka, Baligashu, Mantum, Bambalang and Bafanji in the Ngoketunjia division in northwest Cameroon. The school building, which was dedicated amid great ceremony and fanfare, houses two classrooms and two administrative offices.

Working with our partners in Cameroon, the Ngoketunjia AIDS Fighters (NAFI), our group also met with several government officials and tribal leaders to discuss our objectives and gain the endorsement and support needed for successful and sustainable implementation of our initiatives.

At every stop, we were welcomed with warm Cameroonian hospitality and heartfelt thanks. In every village, we met with people who, despite living in the most primitive conditions, exuded their joyous faith in Jesus Christ and the belief that their lives will be better, if not in this world, then the next.

What impressed us most is the desire of the villagers to be self-reliant. Although there are still many unmet needs, there is great determination to overcome the inherent challenges of poverty and a resolve that, with a little help, they will prepare a better way of living for the next generation.

Find details about future missions on our Upcoming Trips page.


November 2007

Arrival Date: November 2007
Destination: Ngoketunjia
Trip Length: 2 Weeks
Contribution: Backpacks & supplies for 150 OVCs.

View pictures from this trip >>
In November 2007, A Place of Hope took a seven person team on a mission trip to the Ngokutunjia division to ascertain the needs of the orphans and vulnerable children (OVC.)

The highlight of the trip was meeting the children. These students were content to be in classrooms with no air conditioning, often with dirt floors and unfinished roofs. One of the largest schools conducted classes under a thatch roof supported by posts. We met elementary school children who were learning calculus, world history, and vertebrate biology. Education is so highly valued that children whose families could not afford tuition were allowed to peer into windows to glean what education they could get from a distance.

We distributed gift bags filled with school and hygienic supplies, pajamas and candy to 150 OVCs we were already supporting. We also distributed 100 backpacks to other children. While we had supplied much, the need was far greater: we learned that more than 4,000 confirmed OVC lived within the villages we visited.

While looking into the faces of these students - some barefoot, some with uniforms torn, some with little more than the potential within - we saw the hope of what they could become: educators, physicians, nuclear physicists, government officials, even presidents. Only an education stood between them and their potential.

The need continues for the foreseeable future and A Place of Hope resolves to answer the clarion call of Isaiah 6:8: “I heard the voice of the Lord saying, ‘Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?’ Then said I, ‘Here am I. Send me.’”

Find details about future missions on our Upcoming Trips page.


September 2006

Arrival Date: September 2006
Destination: Cameroon
Trip Length: 1 Month
Contribution:School supplies, uniforms, tuition.
When our CEO, Abong Ngranui-Fankam, visited Cameroon in September 2006, she delivered school supplies, uniforms, tuition and much needed funds. But she received so much more. “I listened to the children’s stories and visions for their lives. The kids said they wanted to be doctors and lawyers. Some said they wanted to become AIDS advocates; others wanted to find a cure.”

During her month-long visit, Abong counseled with many of the children and families who were benefiting from the work of Place of Hopes. Many children touched her heart, but one young girl stood out. “I couldn’t get Ida out of my mind,” she remembered. This was a quiet 11-year-old who had already lost both parents, and an aunt and uncle. “She told me that everywhere she went to live, someone died. She was grieving and feared the unknown – yet she wants to become an AIDS advocate. She wants to educate others, so perhaps they won’t experience what she has.”

Abong says the trip was enlightening, encouraging and inspirational. “It was gratifying to see the progress we have made,” she said. “We have helped many children, families and caregivers. But there is much more to be done. We continue to need financial support; we continue to need prayer.”

“It is easy to become discouraged when you see the pain and suffering first-hand. But when I looked into the eyes of these children I visited, I saw light and hope. They are the future of the world. We can’t let that future slip from their grasp.”

Find details about future missions on our Upcoming Trips page.